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What You Need To Know About The LSAT | LSAT Test Preparation | Acing Your LSAT  

What You Need To Know About Your LSAT

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is required for admission by all Law School Admission Council law schools in the United States.

The LSAT consists of five sections of multiple-choice questions (175 minutes total), plus a 30-minute writing sample. Although the writing sample is always administered last, the five 35-minute multiple-choice sections can appear in any order.

What is the LSAT?

The LSAT is a graduate entrance examination which is required from students who want to get into a law school The purpose of the LSAT is to differentiate among them.

The LSAT measures the ability to read and comprehend complex texts, manage and organize information, and process information to reach conclusions. In addition to the required reasoning abilities, the LSAT measures the examinee's speed, accuracy and skill at planning, discipline, and mechanics.

The Five Sections are as follows:

 
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Logical Reasoning section contains 24-26 questions. You have got 35 minutes for this section. You will get at least two, and possibly three, Logical Reasoning sections. (If you get three, you know one of them is the experimental section, but you cannot know which one). This section contains short logical arguments, usually just three or four sentences, and you will be asked one or two questions about each argument. You may be asked to identify the flaw in an argument, or you may be asked about the conclusion to a valid argument. Each section typically contains 25 questions. This section may be the most important, since about half your LSAT score will come from Logical Reasoning sections (since there are two scored sections vs. one each for the other sections).

Reading Comprehension contains 26-28 questions. You have got 35 minutes for this section. You will get at least one, and possibly two, Reading Comprehension sections. (If you get two, you know one of them is the experimental section, but you cannot know which one). Each Reading Comprehension section will be 35 minutes long and will contain four relatively long (about 500 words) passages on various subjects. There will usually be between six and eight questions associated with a passage. The passages will cover a wide spectrum of subjects, some of which you may be familiar with, and others that you may have never heard of. Usually there is a passage related to a natural science, one on some kind of social or political issue, one on a legal or educational issue, and a wildcard that can be on anything. Remember that these passages are NOT written for clarity, but are designed to be complicated and hard to understand. Some passages will be easier to understand than others, and they may vary in length.

Logic Games contains 23-24 questions. You have got 35 minutes for this section. You will get at least one, and possibly two, Analytical Reasoning sections. (If you get two, you know one of them is the experimental section, but you cannot know which one). Analytical Reasoning sections are commonly known as the "Logic Games" section. In this section, you will have four individual logic games, each of which will have 5-7 questions associated with it, for a total of 22-23 questions per section. For each game, you are given a set of rules governing a situation, and you must determine the proper grouping, matching or ordering of individual participants. For example, you might have to determine the gender, age, and occupation of set of people based on rules you're given. The rules are incomplete and individual questions may add rules that do not apply to the rest of the section.

"Experimental" contains 23-28 questions. You have get 35 minutes for this section.

Writing Sample is the last section of LSAT. This section is 30 minutes instead of 35. The writing sample is not graded, but it will be supplied to the Law Schools you apply to along with your LSAT score.

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